Jat robinson redating the new testament

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He studied at Jesus College, Cambridge and Trinity College, Cambridge, and then trained for ordination at Westcott House, Cambridge. In 1948, Robinson became chaplain of Wells Theological College, where he wrote his first book, In the End, God.In 1951, he was appointed Fellow and Dean of Clare College, Cambridge and a lecturer in divinity at Cambridge University.The appointment of Robinson as a suffragan bishop was in Stockwood's gift, and whilst the Archbishop of Canterbury (at that point Geoffrey Fisher) questioned the appointment on the grounds that he believed Robinson at that point would be doing more valuable work as a theologian, he accepted that once he had given advice he had "done all that it was proper for him to do" and proceeded to consecrate Robinson to the episcopate.

However, he said as he was dying that he "never doubted the essential truth of Christianity," which suggests he had not abandoned the idea of God. This earlier dating of Revelation fits with the fact that John seems to assume a still-standing temple in Revelation 11, it also fits with John clearly identifying the coming great persecution of Nero (AD 60s) and the widely-believed concept that at least some of Revelation's symbols (if not all) refer to the catastrophic events of AD70-73. Christian Origins is dedicated to publishing articles distinguished by their attention to detail and reasoned approach.Robinson seemed to rapidly become a person upon whom religious people projected their own ideas of what he was like, and the book The Honest to God Debate, edited by Robinson and by David L Edwards, also published in 1963, contains a mixture of articles which either praise Robinson for his approach or accuse him of atheism.Although Robinson was considered a liberal theologian, he challenged the work of like-minded colleagues in the field of exegetical criticism.

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